Transport & Traffic Dept.

Now Available, the following book written by a retired Traffic officer, PC Steve Woodward, a Society member.

FROM T FORD TO T5
100 YEARS OF HAMPSHIRE CONSTABULARY TRANSPOR
T

AVAILABLE FROM:
Steve Woodward: contact: woodward5@btinternet.com

cheques made payable to: S. Woodward for £22.99 inc p&p.

ISBN 1-904408-05-2

‘From T Ford to T5’ follows the development of the Police car from the very early days through to the latter part of the 20th Century, from the Model T Ford to the Volvo V70 T5.

Unlike most previous Police vehicle publications that give a general overview of vehicles used by various Police forces in the UK, with captioned photographs, this new publication concentrates on just one force – Hampshire.

Long recognised as one of the pioneering forces in the UK as far as its transport policy is concerned, this book charts the development, by decade, of the cars used, the advances in technology, performance, equipment and livery. Hampshire was criticised at the highest levels of government in the 1960s and 70s when it dared to purchase foreign cars for the first time.

Read all about the politics involved, the funding, the personalities who shaped Hampshire’s transport policy and the reasons behind it all. You will also learn about servicing methods and how the force’s mechanics made their own component parts because the manufacturers either couldn’t or wouldn’t. There is also a fascinating insight to the types of fuel used from four star leaded to the Diesel Fuel Project and the use of electric patrol cars.

1920 New Hudson motorycle, Hampshire's first at Basingstoke

 

 

The book opens with two chapters on the old city forces of Portsmouth and Southampton. There are separate chapters on the trial cars tested over the years and on restored Hampshire cars and diecast models depicting vehicles used by the force.

 

1920 New Hudson motorycle

 

 

 

 

 

I believe the photo was taken in the mid seventies. Fleet Service Area opened in 1974. Judging by its semi-developed appearance the photograph was taken shortly after that. I am unable to recall the names of the other officers present.”

Jaguar XJ – which year?

Steve Woodward says, “1983 was the year. We had 16 of them plus a dark green one for the Chief. They really looked the part but weren’t very reliable. Jaguar messed up the order and delivered the wrong specification but for some reason we kept them and didn’t send them back.”

Rural Policing
In the 1950s and 60s the mode of transport for rural officers was the Velocette LE200 motorcycle

PC Ron Foord, stationed at Rowlands Castle. Photograph taken in July or August 1969 at Havant police station yard by Colin Derrick

These bikes were ideal for rural work being water cooled and silent running

Fareham Traffic line-up below at old police station yard, Osborne Road in 1950s (photos Roy Middleton)

(CG was a Hampshire registration number)
Note: the bells on bumper – such a civilised warning noise compared with the continental two tone!

Note also station petrol pump – Station Sergeants nightmare trying to get figures to add up and then the keys would always get lost!

For those interested in these things there is a Police Car UK site

Wolseleys had been the traffic patrol car chosen by many police forces at this time along with Triumph motorcycles.

(CG was a Hampshire registration number)
Note: the bells on bumper – such a civilised warning noise compared with the continental two tone! 

Note also station petrol pump – Station Sergeants nightmare trying to get figures to add up and then the keys would always get lost!

For those interested in these things there is a 
Police Car UK site

Wolseleys had been the traffic patrol car chosen by many police forces at this time along with Triumph motorcycles.

 

 

 

Roy Middleton (now deceased) wrote:

click to enlarge

Fareham Traffic line-up below at old police station yard, Osborne Road in 1950s (photos Roy Middleton)

Left to right – me, Brian Blease, Nick Carter and Peter Hillier. My car was C20 – Peter Hillier was alongside C21 (Monty Farrier’s and Maurie Annetts -both deceased I’m afraid.)  Brian Blease is, I think also deceased.  Nick Carter and Peter Hillier still alive and well.  My ‘older ‘car was the 6/90 – RCG 585, exchanged for 600 ACG in Jan 1960 – I collected it from factory and ran it in for 2000 miles before it was kitted out and became the new C20.

Apart from Traffic Sergeant Jack Hamblin (after Ch/Insp now deceased I’m afraid – he was a good old friend to me) no-one else apart from Peter Hillier and myself drove C20 – it was on the road 8 hours a day only, in the garage for the other 16.

Before being garaged after each shift it was refuelled, washed down and leathered ready for the next tour of duty, clean as a new pin. I was very proud of that car, as, of course, I was of 600 ACG with its ocelot carpet, and then, 3 years later, a 6/110 – 286 KAA -this ended up at Havant as an area car, (I think but I had left here in 1964 – George Wenman took it there) This 6/110 was one of the last black Wolseleys – force went onto Austin 110s then and changed to white ones.

At Andover in about 1965 or 66, I had the last A/110 as an area car – picked it up from the old Lyndhurst Police Stn.

Ah well, happy days.

Up until the 1970s Traffic Department were supplied with Triumph motorcycles then the Norton Commando 750/850s, which were replaced, in turn by BMW R80RTs – with the non BMW fairing and panniers, which was a pity

In 1995 trials were undertaken with Honda ST1100s. These were successful and the whole bike fleet converted to them.

 

A Lifetime spent in the Force Workshops

In the county force, traffic police vehicles were originally serviced by Traffic Officers taking the cars to HQ and using garage facilities there to do oil changes etc. When repairs were required the vehicles would be taken to a local main dealers. Traffic motorcyclists would come off patrol to service their own bikes at stations. In the the 1960’s, the fleet expanded and as an obvious cost saving measure and to improve efficiency, the force set up its own vehicle workshops.